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The Importance of How We See Ourselves
The Importance of How We See Ourselves

The past fifteen years have seen a wellspring of interest in the concept and practical nature of the self. Questions about the metaphysics of personal identity have preoccupied philosophical scholarship. Less attention has been paid to the topic of the self from the first-person standpoint-the point of view of a person who regards certain phenomena as distinctive of, or essential to, one's identity. Nor has much attention been paid to how this conception of the self is related to responsible agency.

In this book, Marina Oshana explores the nature of the self and the practical significance of a sense of self in the lives of human agents. She develops a hybrid view of the self as constituted of cognitive, affective, and behavioral characteristics that shape the subject's practical and deliberative engagements. Oshana investigates what it means to be oneself and the significance of this condition for a person's status as an agent. Unless it is possible to identify the normal condition of a person when one "is oneself," it is impossible to fully understand the person's motives and behavior or to accurately judge one's responsibility for what one does.

Oshana argues that responsible parties are unified agents, a status that calls for an admixture of being oneself, authorship, executive control, and intentionality in thought and action. In order to be responsible for one's character, mental states, and conduct, a person must have a healthy, veridical sense of self. By way of illustration, Oshana surveys certain pathologies of the self that impair the lucidity of person's sense of self or disturb general features of responsible agency.



Item: 073912626
Price: $14.98


   

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